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Common examples of workplace sexual harassment

If you don't understand what workplace sexual harassment looks like, there's a chance you may let this unacceptable behavior continue. As a result, it can impact your career and personal life in a variety of ways.

There are many forms of workplace sexual harassment, with these five among the most common:

  • Sharing inappropriate material: From sexually charged images to lewd jokes, there are many types of material that should never be part of the workplace.
  • Making sexual comments: This can include but is not limited to comments regarding clothing, body parts or appearance in general.
  • Making inappropriate contact: There is never a time when one person should touch another in an inappropriate manner. This is the easiest form of workplace sexual harassment to spot.
  • Repeatedly asking for a date: Although many people meet at the office, repeatedly asking for a date is a common form of workplace sexual harassment. There are times when it's okay to ask once, but if the answer is no, that should be the end of the conversation.
  • Making comments about a person's gender: Some comments about a person's gender could be considered sexual harassment. An example of this is repeatedly saying that a coworker only received a raise because of their good looks.

If you ever feel that you're the victim of workplace sexual harassment, don't sit back and hope that things get better. Tell the other person to stop, report the incident to your supervisor and/or HR department and learn more about your legal rights. Taking immediate action is the best way to put your mind at ease and to hopefully stop this behavior in its tracks.

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