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How to discover if your work has a pay gap

Although companies have made progress in closing the pay gap between men and women, there is still a substantial gap between the amount of money women make compared to men. In fact, recent research suggests many women make 80 cents for every dollar a man makes for the same work. The disparity grows even larger when the woman is not Caucasian. 

Many women remain unaware that a pay gap exists at their place of work because they assume their bosses are reputable and honest. However, there are certain actions and behaviors at work that suggest a wage disparity exists. If you suspect your boss does not pay you as much as you are worth, then it is vital to dig deeper and see if you can find a systemic pattern of abuse.

Look up how much your position should pay online

First, it is critical to know whether your employer pays you at least the average for your work in your industry. You can look up how much people tend to make in your profession on sites like Indeed, Monster and Glassdoor. You may be able to find exactly how much someone in your position should make if you work for a governmental agency, university or non-profit organization. The law requires these institutions to publicly report all expenses, including how much they pay employees. 

Connect with coworkers you can trust

Many times, the most accessible course of action is to speak with people in your workplace to learn how much they make. You need to talk with people you know you can trust, so they do not report anything to management at this time. The evidence becomes particularly telling if a male employee who has the same job as you makes more money than you. This is a clear indicator of bias. At this point, you need to bring the discrepancy to the attention of your superiors and consider legal action. 

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