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How to know if you have a sexual harassment case

Sexual harassment at work can be a very unpleasant experience, and one that can make employees feel ashamed or embarrassed. You may also feel as though by taking action, you are making a big deal out of nothing. But this is not the case. If you have been feeling uncomfortable at work due to a colleague's sexual advances, the chances are that you have a reason to make a sexual harassment claim.

This blog will provide a brief overview into what is classified as sexual harassment in the workplace, and what you should do if you have experienced such behavior.

The behavior must be unwelcome

If someone is partaking in behavior that you do not welcome, it can constitute sexual harassment. This could be anything from a verbal remark such as commenting on your appearance, to a physical act such as unwelcome touching. It can even be done through body language such as looking someone up and down or staring.

The behavior must be either severe or pervasive

Minor or subtle actions that are done frequently are enough to constitute sexual harassment. Similarly, a serious action that is done just once is also sexual harassment. The actions must be either pervasive or severe, but they do not have to be both.

The behavior must affect working conditions

If the behavior is enough to create a hostile environment in the workplace, then it can be considered as workplace sexual harassment. This is especially true if a negative action is taken against you, for example, you are demoted or refused a promotion.

An attorney can help you learn more about your legal options for filing a sexual harassment claim.

Source: equal rights, "Sexual harassment at work," accessed Sep. 07, 2017

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